Advocacy


Advocacy is one of the most important and under utilised components of a Nurses job. It sits at the very core of our being, the reason behind every action, and heart behind every conversation with a Doctor. Recently, whilst caring for a patient, I didn’t exercise my right to advocate for them, and as such they have continued to be mis-managed. For confidentiality reasons I will not disclose particulars of the patient, but will instead refer to them as Jeff. I have come up with a nemonic of ABCDE to remind me of the components of Advocacy for the future, and I hope they will help you too.

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Always

As some of you are aware I am both an Enrolled Nurse, and a student Registered Nurse. I am also on my last placement before graduating at the end of the year. I felt that because Jeff was a patient of mine, whilst under supervision, as a student I couldn’t or shouldn’t raise my concerns and subsequently Advocate for them. I was wrong. As Nurses we should always feel empowered to Advocate for our patients. It doesn’t matter if you are a LPN, EEN, AIN, GRN, RN, CN, or NUM you should feel comfortable to stop what is happening and Advocate for your patient. I have been beating myself up since the event, and cannot seem to console myself regarding my inaction. Jeff continues to be, in my opinion, mismanaged because I, and others, feel that we cannot raise our voices and say STOP, this isn’t in the best interest for the patient. STOP, we need a different course of action. STOP, we are not caring for and treating this patient, we are treating our own conveniences. I wish I had spoken up, but now I know what a difference it could have made, and how lousy it feels when I don’t, I will never step down from Advocacy again and I will encourage others to do the same.

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Back Up

When Advocating for a patient we should remember we aren’t just individual Nurses, we are part of a team, and we are stronger together. That wasn’t supposed to sound like a chant for a Union, but there you go. If we don’t feel strong enough to confront a Doctor directly, enlist help from other Nurses in the team, bring in the Supervisor, the Shift Coordinator, the Clinical Educator, the Clinical Facilitator, or even the Nurse Unit Manager. Together you can approach the Doctor and Advocate appropriately, it will look less like an idea from a solo Nurse and more like a considered idea, and it is good to know that you are justified in your Advocacy when you have the assistance of another. This won’t come across as “Ganging Up” if done correctly, and could be the component you need to successfully Advocate for your patient.

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Considerate

As Nurses we pull some pretty long and random hours, with things like Late-Early shift, overtime, Double Shifts, and a myriad of other whacky ways the roster seems to wind up. Our job is physically demanding by being on our feet all day, lifting and rolling patients, performing care, and everything else we do in a shift. Our job is also emotionally and mentally draining with supporting the patients and their families, dosage calculations, evaluating observations, constantly assessing a patient, and somewhere in all of that is Advocacy. Now, we all know what we do is demanding and exhausting, we justify the extra coffee, the second bar of chocolate, or ignoring the phone on breaks because of it. We flay ourselves over jobs missed, or errors in judgement, and we feel terrible when things are late. Now, our Doctors may not be there for the hands on cares, the lifting and rolling, the supporting the patient during mobility, but they are carrying the burden. The Doctors are trying to manage a massive patient load, the medications, the investigations, the outcomes, the families, and the demands we as Nurses put on them. The Doctors are under the pump all the time. They can’t ignore the phone, their breaks are constantly cut short, they are the ones that get to explain to the patient and their family about a poor prognosis. They have a huge burden to carry. When we advocate for our patients we need to be Considerate and keep in mind these burdens. Don’t Advocate by telling them they are wrong and should be doing it a different way, or calling into question their education. Come along side of the Doctors and show them what you are seeing and suggest the alternative course of action.

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Don’t forget the Patient

We shouldn’t forget that the reason we advocate is for the best outcome for the patient, as such we shouldn’t forget to include them in the decision making process. It may be entirely necessary, and entirely justified to discuss your concerns with the patient prior to stepping up in front of the Doctor. Some patients, despite the best intentions you may have won’t want to take differing actions to what the Doctor has ordered. This is why it is important to discuss your concerns with the patient, or if the patient is unable to then a discussion with the next of kin may be appropriate. This seems simple, but can be just as difficult, if not more difficult to achieve. Discussing with a patient that the care that has been prescribed isn’t the best, and a different action would be better, can be seen as conniving, sinister, arrogant, or just plain rude. A polite tongue and respective tone when discussing this matter will need to be adopted, and under no circumstances should the Nurse belittle or bad mouth the Doctor, or professional prescribing the care. We are all a team, we need the Doctors just as much as we need them, nobody wants to be seen as “That Nurse” and as such we shouldn’t behave that way.

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Evidence

Whilst we should advocate for our patients, always, we need to make sure we have the evidence required to back up our claims. This can be something as simple of observations, blood work, an x-ray, comment made by family or friends of the patient, or statements made by the patient themselves. We may also have written evidence from Journals, textbooks, Research Articles, or recently attended workshops or conferences. It may be something as simple as showing the doing guide from MIMS or the product information leaflet enclosed with the medication. We as Nurses need to be prepared when confronting Doctors in relation to our patients, it may not be enough for us to simply say “I am not happy, we need to do something differently”. Being educated, well read, up to date, best practice using badasses we are we need to show the Doctors that we know what we are talking about, and that we need to be listened to.

These five components; Always, Back Up, Considerate, Don’t forget the Patient, and Evidence or ADCDE, will help you remember what needs to be considered when Advocating for your patient. Don’t end up where I did with Jeff. Don’t be afraid to stand up and be heard. Don’t think that you are just a Nurse. You are the patient Advocate, exercise the right, but do it properly.

Maintain the Rage

Luke Sondergeld

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