Culture Change

During my time in the Navy we were going through a period of Culture Change. We wanted to shift away from the mentalities of old, the drinking, the boys club, the bastardisation and the initiation nonsense and move into a tolerant, caring and supportive environment. It was met with resistance, people were claiming it was turning the Navy soft, it was bowing down to the masses, but the Admiralty persevered. To the betterment of the Australian Navy as we know it. Culture change in any organisation, whether five people of 35,000 people is difficult. It takes determination, resolve and broad shoulders to deal with the comments that will inevitably head in your direction. If you have ever been part of culture change, whether the instigator, a staff member, or new to the workplace you know how hard it can be to stay out of the political arguments, and get down to the job of moving forward. I want to discuss with everyone three easy ways to support and effect culture change from the bottom up. I will address Acceptance, Rebellion and Action, and your part in it.

Stepping Stones

I am a planner; short term, medium term, and long term. I like to know what I am doing next week, next month, next year, and sometimes I pipe dream and try and plan out the next decade. This has lead me to some great situations, experiences and people, and some not so pleasant ones. But, I would still rather have a plan then to stumble around in the dark. To plan effectively though, each phase has a very deliberate goal associated with it. That is the topic of discussion today. What I consider the important things each phase of planning needs; the Short, the Medium and the Long Term.

Reasons Why

We all go about our daily toils for various reasons, we go to work because we all enjoyed breakfast and thought more food would be great, we send our children to school so they may become educated and hopefully out perform us, we wash our clothes so others will actually talk to us and we clean out homes so we don't wind up on reality television. These mundane activities all have reasons, motivations or at least some sense of why. But have you every stopped to consider the reason why you do most of your actions? It may surprise you that some things you do you simply do because you always have. In Leadership we always discuss this notion of culture change and how we can go about it, and the hardest thing to overcome is Thats the way we have always done it. No one knows why, or who made the decision, simply thats the way its always been.

Placed Upon

Through out our lives we get called a lot of different things, whether by virtue of our job, by our loved-ones, our friends and those around us. These names, these titles, carry with them a certain level of expectation from the person giving them to us; it places us in a position that we may not fully understand ourselves.

Walking With

I have been reflecting this week on my personal journey, my failures and triumphs, the good leaders and the bad, the men and women who invested their time in me, and those who left a lasting impression. I reflected on leadership and the importance of Mentoring those who we lead and not just giving blind directions. I reflected on the importance of walking a journey with someone beside them, not in front leading blindly, or from behind barking arbitrarily. This lead me to write about, what I believe, is the most important facet of Leadership, and that is Mentoring. The understanding between two individuals at different points on their journey to walk together and learn from each others experiences. This may sound like a different model of mentoring than what is commonly taught, namely where an experienced person takes an inexperienced person and attempts to impart knowledge and experience on them. I kindly draw your attention back to the person leading from the front. Or where a person will share their experiences with staff or individuals via a mass email while never actually allowing time for the people to engage with them personally, I draw you attention to the person barking from the rear.

Baby Lessons

There are numerous baby websites, books, journals, and magazines that will gladly tell you that there is a million things you should get for your new bundle of joy. Couple that with friends, family, mothers, in laws, outlaws and everyone in between, there is a lot of information to sift through. With the announcement of My wife and I having our second child together, third in total, this week I felt it prudent to share some lessons learnt from the first one, Darby. I will cover the things that I Would do again and the things that I most certainly Wouldn't.

Maintaining Boundaries

When I was younger, my parents, especially my Father, wanted to ensure that I was self-sufficient, self-motivated, but most importantly, self-disciplined. We all learn what is right and what is wrong, we develop a morale compass that points us in the right direction, the hardest thing to teach our children is how to read their compass and navigate by it. One of the waypoints to self-discipline that I was taught by my parents was Boundaries.

Days Gone By

I have been reflecting over the week, and discussing with fellow Nursing Students, some of my previous work history, what it entailed and why I am not still doing some of those jobs. It forced me to look at the jobs in a different light. While I was doing them, I genuinely enjoyed them, then for one reason or another, I stopped enjoying them, I left, and began a different journey. In this post, I will explain three of my most recent, most intense and most enjoyable jobs that I have been involved in, what I took away from them and why I eventually left. I will talk about my life as a Croupier, my Navy Career and my time as a Not-For-Profit employee.